alcohol interventions

Case Study: Stay-at-Home Mom (Kelly)

It wasn’t until the COVID-19 crisis that her life totally fell apart. Overnight, she had to start homeschooling, her daily activities were totally disrupted, and the stress of having three kids (and her husband!) in the house all day long drove her to drink more and more.

My Story

In recovery I have been able to do some amazing things. I adopted two children from Colombia, graduated from a top business school, and I started and sold a successful company. Getting sober has been, without a doubt, that one best accomplishments of my life.

10 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Treatment Center

It’s so crucial for the recovery process for the individual to find the right treatment center. There can be a vast difference in quality—and price: thirty days of treatment can range from $7,500 to $120,000—and finding the right facility takes research. When you’re doing research on a facility, be sure to ask these questions.

Treatment Trauma: The Intervention Gone Wrong

An intervention done properly is actually a very loving meeting. A good intervention is about enabling the suffering person to understand their situation – the goal being to get them to acknowledge that they need help and begin to ask for it.

The Intervention is Just the Beginning

After successfully placing a newly recovering person suffering from addiction in a treatment facility after an intervention, your work with Suntra may not be over. To a certain extent, the hard work is still to come. At Suntra, we offer more than just intervention services: we also offer family support while a loved one is undergoing treatment. We understand and have worked through many of the common problems that come up for families during treatment; we know that, most likely, your loved one is going to call sometime in the first week of treatment asking to leave. This is a common call, and we can work with you on how to handle it. Perhaps even more importantly, while your loved one is in treatment we can work together to look at the dynamics at home that may have encouraged or enabled addiction. Often, family members have inadvertently become caught up in the cycle of addiction. The process begins slowly, without anyone realizing what’s happening, and becomes a cyclone that sweeps up other people, careers, and finances. While the patient is in treatment, the team at Suntra works with the family to set boundaries—firm lines in the sand—of what they are… Read More »The Intervention is Just the Beginning

The First Meeting is the Most Important (October 26, 2006)

I have two sobriety dates that are meaningful to me: the date that I attended my first 12 Step meeting, and the date that I finally committed to living a life of abstinence—a date so important to me that I had it tattooed on the back of my arm.

Things Not to Say During an Intervention

By the time an intervention has been called, the family is almost always at their wits’ end. (Though an intervention usually seems like a last resort, we can easily make the case that it should be called earlier—not after “the last straw.”) Over the years, the family of someone suffering from addiction has probably tried everything they can think of, and certainly all the yelling and guilt-tripping that can be so easy, in these cases, to fall into. However, an intervention should be a loving meeting. We work together to encourage someone into treatment with love, respect, and support—and so we have to break through, and discard, the methods that have tried and failed in the past. Family members may have things they feel they need to say, because they’ve been hurt and they want their loved one to understand that. But a lot of what family members want to say should not be said. Those techniques have not worked in the past, though they’ve probably been tried many times. In our interventions, we don’t enter attack mode: we stay calm. We don’t want to trigger an argument, which is unlikely to lead to change. There are a few things… Read More »Things Not to Say During an Intervention