interventions hamptons

Four Reasons to Use a Recovery Coach

Recovery coaching can be a fantastic tool for people working to maintain recovery from drugs and alcohol. I like to think of coaching as a way to bring recovery into “real life.” Treatment centers and therapy can also be very useful, but recovery coaching is unique in that it focuses on on-the-ground problem solving for the day-to-day. Here’s what I focus on in my recovery coaching: Future Looking: Therapy and rehabilitation centers tend to focus on trauma and the past—absolutely necessary to recover, but not always actionable today. In contract, recovery coaching looks at what’s happening right now, focuses on ways to navigate the present, and makes plans for the future. As a coach, I know that my job is not to provide therapy—but I can offer consistent check-ins to help maintain sobriety and build a better life. Professional Guidance: As someone who works in recovery, I’ve seen many clients navigate recovery resources in their communities. I have a vast body of knowledge about different outpatient programs, therapists, and 12 Step meetings, and I can help connect clients to the tools that will best meet their needs. Accountability Your Way: A recovery coach can reinforce accountability in a different way… Read More »Four Reasons to Use a Recovery Coach

Close to Relapse: “As Prescribed by a Doctor”

My injuries were so severe that my doctor put me on an opiate painkiller, which I didn’t know much about at the time. Nor did the general population: it was just before the opiate crisis became a national news story.

Aftercare: Reintegrating the Family

Returning home, after treatment, is where the rubber meets the road in recovery. Most treatment facilities have family programs where clinicians begin working with the family as soon as the patient checks in. This can be key to long-term success, for both the patient and the family.

I Am Always Close to Relapse

Over the 12 years, I have had many close calls to relapse. Alcohol is always there and it is always easy to grab a drink. However other things, like prescription drugs, have been more tempting to me. Drinking is one thing, but prescriptions seem to be more alluring to me.

Walking Back in The Door After Treatment

For someone to successfully recover, work needs to be done in his or her daily living situations. This takes time. There is a saying that anyone can stay sober in a treatment facility. Additional time and energy must be spend on recovery on return home.

Common Concerns About In-Patient Treatment

I work with many people struggling from addiction, some people need to kick start their recovery by going in-patient treatment is often the best option for treatment.  In-patient rehabilitation offers a month away from day-to-day life to detoxify in a safe environment, as well as provide patients with the mental health services necessary to start recovery.   While a 30-day program is often the recommended choice, it is also a very difficult decision to make.  Jumping out of life for 30 days is not easy, but the benefits of a strong foundation for recovery that can change behavior for a lifetime is often worth the trade off.  Time Time away is a very real concern.  Entering an inpatient rehabilitation program is essentially pausing a month (or more) of one’s life.  One might be resistant to the idea of having to be away from work or their families, however addiction takes steals time from families and from work.  People often lose several hours in a day, if not entire days, when under the influence.  Once in recovery people find that they have much more time to dedicate to passions, family, and work.  Taking 30 days away might give someone 5 extra hours… Read More »Common Concerns About In-Patient Treatment

Pre-flight Planning for an Intervention

I liken my approach to addiction interventions to that of getting an airplane ready to fly. Just as a pilot must exhaust a list of external factors in order to fly successfully, a successful intervention requires just as much forethought.

Why Can He Just Stop Drinking?

A common refrain said by anyone who is tired of watching someone sink down the hole of addiction. It’s a reasonable question, and one that perplexes anyone who is not addicted. A family member can watch as one’s health deteriorates, family and friends turn away, money is lost and legal problems arise. Why can’t someone just stop? We often help non-addicts understand addiction, and why the logical mind does not control the addicted mind. Think about the feeling of being hungry. Can you think yourself un-hungry? When you’re hungry and you try to think about it logically, the result is that you feel more hunger. The desire for drugs exists in the very same part of the brain that triggers the desire for food. Deep in our brain is the limbic system, or the “brain reward system”. When we are thirsty or hungry, water or food are a reward to the limbic system. Eating food and drinking water makes us feel good and so we do it again and again, ensuring survival. Drugs and alcohol hit the limbic system pretty hard. Drugs and alcohol can be quite enjoyable and the reward system kicks in. The same part of our brain… Read More »Why Can He Just Stop Drinking?

I had to change my views about recovery (after 10 years of sobriety).

Continuous sobriety and recovery are not the same thing. For many people and for 12 Step programs sobriety is the only definition of recovery. Sobriety might be a goal of recovery, but the transition from full blown addiction to sobriety, cold turkey, is very difficult. Recovery is the path to getting sober.